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Meghan and Scott at the Nita Lake Lodge

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler
Meghan is a real Whistler local who grew up in the town. Her parents are friends of mine, which is a bit unusual for most of my wedding clients, who are mostly visitors to Whistler. She really wanted a winter Whistler wedding, and couldn’t have gotten a better day for it.

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler
Getting ready at the Nita Lake Lodge.

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler
Because the wedding was in January, and the day’s really short, we had to do the portraits before the ceremony. When we shoot before the wedding ceremony, I always do a first look photo to get a shot of Scott’s reaction to seeing Meghan in her dress for the first time.

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler
The Bridal Party with the Nita lake Lodge in the background.

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler
Sometimes you just get lucky with a photo. I was setting up this photo when this big CN freight train rolled past. Because we were int he forest, we couldn’t hear it until a couple of seconds before the train arrived. Meghan was literally lined up perfectly with the train. I couldn’t imagine a more Canadian winter wedding image.

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler
Lock and key.

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler
The ceremony at the Nita Lake Lodge. Everyone was glad to have the large outdoor roof with the blowing snow.

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler

Nita Lake Lodge Wedding at Whistler
I stopped by after dinner to get some portraits of the bridal party in the Nita Lake Lodge‘s great Cure Lounge.

Technical Details
A big shout out to my longtime friend, wedding planner Linda Marshall of Whistler Wedding Planners. With such a large and complex wedding, it would have been pretty tough to get the shots without her and her crew.

With the heavy snow we had, it’s pretty much impossible to use flash, as all it does is light up the falling snow. On the other hand, the snow itself is really reflective, so it kicks in a lot of light to fill all the shadows on the subject’s faces.